Did You Know…?

 Colocasia Esculenta

Taro is the mother plant of Hawaiian culture – not just the “daily bread” of nourishment but also the abiding symbol of social harmony. The plant is cultivated throughout the Pacific and Southeast Asia, but nowhere with the industry and ingenuity of the ancient Hawaiians.

Taro is a marsh plant, so the Hawaiians excelled in the construction of waterworks and clever flowing ponds (called lo’i) in which the farmers waded. They developed three hundred varieties of taro, some adapted to dry land conditions. Their folklore describes taro as the older sibling of the human race, and people saw the growth habit of taro-in expanding clusters of offshoots called ‘oha-as a perfect metaphor for a well-run family, or ‘ohana.

All parts of the plant are eaten, from the starchy corm (root) to the spinach-like leaves. Uncooked, the plant is acrid because its flesh is full of sharp crystals of calcium oxalate. Cooking eliminates their bite. Once cooked, the corm is generally pounded to make poi, an excellent carbohydrate food. The cooked greens, called lu’au, are a nutritious source of minerals and vitamins A, B and C.

Experience all the beauty of Hawai’i at Botanical World… 

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                    Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Have you Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Why not Write a review?

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s