When it’s Time to Start the Next Chapter in Your Life…

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Start Life’s Greatest Adventure… with us…at Botanical World.

 

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The Legend of Karaipahoa…

The following is the tradition given by the natives of the original idol. In the reign of Kumaraua, an ancient king of Molokai, lived Kaneakama, a great gambler. Playing one day at maita, (a Hawaiian game,) he lost all that he possessed, except one pig, which, having dedicated to his god, he durst not stake on his game. In the evening he returned home, laid down on his mat, and fell asleep. His god appeared to him in a dream, and directed him to go and play again, on the following day, and stake this pig on his success in a particular part of the play. He awoke in the morning, did as the god had directed, and was remarkably successful through the day. Before he returned home in the evening, he went to the temple of his idol, and there dedicated the greater part of his gain. During his sleep that night the god appeared to him again, and requested him to go to the king, and tell him, that a clump of trees would be seen growing in a certain place in the morning; and that if he would have a god made out of one of them, he would reside in the image, and impart to it his power, signifying also, that Kaneakama should be his priest. Early the next morning, the man who had received the communication from his god went and delivered it to the king, by whom he was directed to take a number of men, and cut down one of the trees, and carve it into an image. As they approached Karua koi, a small valley on the side of one of the mountains in Molokai, they were surprised at beholding a clump of trees, where there had been none before, the gods having caused them to grow up in the course of the preceding night. Into these trees, Kane, and some other gods, are reported to have entered. When they arrived at the spot, the gods, by some sign, directed Kaneakama which tree to cut down. They began to work with their short-handled stone hatchets; but the chips flying on the bodies of one or two of them, they instantly expired. Terrified at the dreadful power of the wood, the others threw down their hatchets, and refused to fell the tree; being urged by Kaneakama, they resumed their work; not, however, till they covered their bodies and faces with native cloth, and the leaves of the ti plant, leaving only a small aperture opposite one of their eyes. Instead of their hatchets, they took their long daggers, or pahoas, with which they cut down the tree, and carved out the image. From this circumstance, the natives say, the idol derived its name, Karai-pahoa, which is literally, dagger cut or carved; from karai, to chip with an adze, or carve, and pahoa, a dagger. Excepting the deities supposed to preside over volcanoes, no god was so much dreaded by the people as Karaipahoa. All who were thought to have died by poison, were said to have been slain by him. (Ellis)

Discover all of the history and lore of the Big Island at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                   Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Write a review

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com

 

 (These are excerpts from a book by William Ellis that has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired.)

Did You Know…?

Dracaena reflexa

This plant has been a main-stay of the tropical foliage plant industry for many years, known by the name Dracaena marginata. However, recent research, some of which has involved DNA technology, has led to the reclassification of this plant (as well as many others), thereby resulting in a “new” and likely unfamiliar name for an old-time favorite plant.

One can find very large, old and mature Red-Edge Dracaena plants growing in the Hilo area, and some of them have actually flowered. Locally they are sometimes called “money plants” by older people, because stem cuttings were sold to commercial foliage plant growers from larger-sized landscape plants for extra cash a number of years ago when demand for cuttings exceeded the supply available from stock plant fields. Stem cuttings of just about any length root easily in just a few weeks by inserting the basal end into growing medium and keeping it damp.

However, it is beneficial to wait about a week after making the cutting to reduce the likelihood of stem rot before planting it.

Experience all the beauty of Hawai’i at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                    Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Have you Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Why not Write a review?

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com

 

 

Explore Our Rainbow Walk…


Adjacent to the gardens entrance is the Rainbow Walk, in which you can view a profusion of tropical trees, shrubs and perennial plants and even a cactus garden. More than a quarter mile of paved pathways wind through the acres of plants in the Rainbow Walk, but visitors are encouraged to meander off the walkways for a closer look or to take pictures.

In this area, you can see blooming anthuriums, azaleas, bougainvillea, bromeliads, crinums, gingers, heliconias, hibiscus, and many other tropical flowering perennials, ferns, shrubs, and trees.

Many varieties of orchids festoon the plants in the Rainbow Walk or cling to the Orchid Wall with new blooms popping out almost every day. Orchids may be near your feet on a stump, peeping out from a pile of logs or hiding on a low-growing bush. They’re in almost every tree, living anywhere from a few feet off the ground to high in the canopy. The orchids come in almost every color from white to almost black. Many are very fragrant and one even smells like chocolate! See cattleyas, dendrobiums, phalaenopsis, vandas, and other species often with several varieties on the same tree. 

Experience all the fun at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                    Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Why Not Write a review

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE or call:

808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

or

Visit BotanicalWorld.com

The third Monday of January is Martin Luther King Day in United States…

MLK

Martin Luther King was an important civil rights activist. He was a leader in the movement to end racial segregation in the United States. His most famous address was the “I Have A Dream” speech. He was an advocate of non-violent protest and became the youngest man to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He was assassinated in 1968.

In 1968, shortly after Martin Luther King died, a campaign was started for his birthday to become a holiday to honor him. After the first bill was introduced, trade unions lead the campaign for the federal holiday. It was endorsed in 1976. Following support from the musician Stevie Wonder with his single “Happy Birthday” and a petition with six million signatures, the bill became law in 1983. Martin Luther King Day was first observed in 1986, although it was not observed in all states until the year 2000. In 1990, the Wyoming legislature designated Martin Luther King Jr/Wyoming Equality Day as a legal holiday.

Martin Luther King Day is a federal holiday held on the third Monday of January. It has slightly different names in some states. Non-essential Government departments are closed, as are many corporations. Some schools and colleges close but others stay open and teach their students about the life and work of Martin Luther King.

Why not Experience your Holiday at Botanical World…

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Botanical World Adventures                               Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                        Open Daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                        Have you visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                           Why not Write a review

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com

 

Discover Hawaii’s only Segway off road rainforest adventure!!


Segway in the Gardens is such a cool experience. When you Segway you know you are having fun, and when you do it in the rainforest — it just doesn’t get any better than this.

Start out with an introductory tour and learn the machine with your certified guide. Then step into the experience of riding on a longer trip where your guides will lead you all through the gardens, the rainforest and even a longer journey to Kamae’e Falls at the top of the gardens property.

See the 360 degree views that include Mauna Kea with its observatories, the paniolo cattle ranch, and the wide blue Pacific Ocean with whales occasionally breaching within view. This is the glide of a lifetime!

Explore the scenic Hawaiian countryside, visit historic areas where your guides will share stories, ride through the gardens and explore the rainforest – all this while effortlessly gliding on a Segway Personal Transporter (PT).

Experience all the fun at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                    Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Why not Write a review

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com

 

A Poisonous Wood…

 

They had a number of sea gods, besides those whom they imagined directed the shoals of fishes to their shores. They had also gods who controlled the winds and changed the weather. During a storm, or other season of danger at sea, they offered up their paro, or pulekurana, a particular kind of prayer; but it is not known to what idol they addressed it. On these occasions, their dread of perishing at sea frequently led them to make vows to some favorite deity; and if they ever reached the land, it was their first business to repair to the temple, and fulfil their vows. These vows were generally considered most sacred engagements; and it was expected that, sooner or later, some judgment would overtake those who failed to perform them. It is not improbable, that the priests of those idols, in order to maintain their influence over the people, either poisoned the delinquents, or caused them to sustain some other injury. Karaipahoa was also a famous idol, originally belonging to Molokai. It was a middling-sized wooden image, curiously carved; the arms were extended, the fingers spread out, the head was ornamented with human hair, and the widely distended mouth was armed with rows of shark’s teeth. The wood of which the image was made was so poisonous, that if a small piece of it was chipped into a dish of poi, or steeped in water, whoever ate the poi, or drank the water, the natives reported, would certainly die in less than twenty-four hours afterwards. We were never able to procure a sight of this image, though we have been repeatedly informed that it still exists, not indeed in one compact image, as it was divided in several parts on the death of Kamehameha, and distributed among the principal chiefs. It is a known fact, that the natives use several kinds of vegetable poison; and probably the wood of which the idol was made is poisonous. But the report of the virulence of the poison is most likely one of the many stratagems so frequently employed by the chiefs and priests, to maintain their influence over the minds of the people. A smaller image of the same god was formed of a hard yellow wood, of which idols were usually made. This was left at Molokai, the original being always carried about by Kamehameha, and, it is said, placed under his pillow whenever he slept. (Ellis)

Discover all of the history and lore of the Big Island at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                   Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Write a review

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com

 

 (These are excerpts from a book by William Ellis that has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired.)