A Conversation on Religious Subjects with the Governor…

During the forenoon, Mr. Harwood made an auger, to aid the well-diggers in boring the rocks. I walked with Mr. Thurston to see what progress they had made, and to encourage them to persevere. The rocks they said were hard, and their progress slow, yet they were not discouraged, but hoped to find the work easier as they descended. After dinner, the governor entered freely into conversation on religious subjects, particularly respecting the resurrection of the body, the destruction of the heavens and the earth at the last day, and the final judgment. After listening attentively to what was said upon these subjects, he inquired about the locality of heaven and hell. He was told that we did not know where the one or the other was situated, as none had ever returned from either, to tell mankind about them; and we only know, that there is a place called heaven, where God makes glorious manifestations of his perfections, and where all good men are perfectly happy; and that there is a place where wicked men are shut up in darkness, and endure endless misery. He then said, “How do you know these things?” I asked for his bible, and translated the passages which inculcate the doctrine of the resurrection, and told him it was from that book we obtained all our knowledge of these things; and that it was the contents of that book which we had come to teach the people of Hawaii. He then asked if all the people in our native countries were acquainted with the bible. I answered, that from the abundant means of instruction enjoyed there, the greater portion of the people had either read the book, or had in some other way become acquainted with its principal contents. He then said, How is it that such numbers of them swear, get intoxicated, and do so many things prohibited in that book? He was told, that there was a vast difference between knowing the word of God, and obeying it; and that it was most likely, those persons knew their conduct was displeasing to God, yet persisted in it, because agreeable to their corrupt inclinations. He asked if God would not be angry with us for troubling him so frequently with our prayers? If he was like man, he said, he was sure he would. I replied, that God was always “waiting to be gracious,” more ready to hear than we were to pray; that indeed he was not like man, or his patience would have been exhausted long ago by the wickedness of men; but that he continued exercising long-suffering and forbearance towards sinners, that they might turn from their wickedness and live.

We supped with the governor as usual, and, after family worship with his household, prepared our baggage for our journey, some of which we left to be forwarded by the Ainoa to Waiakea, a district on the eastern side of the island. (Ellis)

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 (These are excerpts from a book by William Ellis that has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired.)

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Did You Know…?


This Asian tree can be seen growing in the grassy area located towards the beach-facing side of the Joy Perfume Tree. It produces the largest tree-fruit in the world— sometimes exceeding 50 pounds. It is related to the Breadfruit, but it is not eaten until it is ripe.

The fruit tastes like Juicy Fruit Gum, which is not a coincidence, because the original flavor for the gum was obtained from the Jackfruit. There is a considerable amount of sticky latex in the Jackfruit, and it is almost impossible to wash off with soap and water. However, the sticky latex can be removed by rubbing the sticky area with butter or vegetable oil until it has dissolved into the oil, and then washing in warm, soapy water. Like Pineapples, the Jackfruit is a “multiple fruit”, being composed of dozens of individual fruitlets that are fused together into one big composite structure we call a Jackfruit. You need a knife to cut the jackfruit open to expose the fragrant, sweet, yellow to pinkish fruitlets inside. Each fruitlet contains a fairly large seed, which can be roasted or boiled and eaten (minus its thin “shell”), tasting like boiled peanuts

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31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                    Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Have you Visited us in the Past?

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May 1st is Lei Day in Hawai’i…

May Day

May Day on May 1 is an ancient Northern Hemisphere spring festival and usually a public holiday; it is also a traditional spring holiday in many cultures. Dances, singing, and cake are usually part of the celebrations that the day includes.

In Hawaii, May Day is also known as Lei Day, and it is normally set aside as a day to celebrate island culture in general and the culture of the Native Hawaiians in particular. Invented by poet and local newspaper columnist Eric Kosciuszko in the 1920s, it has since been adopted by state and local government, as well as local residents, and has taken on the sense of a general spring celebration. The first official Lei Day was proposed in 1927 in Honolulu by poet and artist Don Blanding. Leonard “Red” and Ruth Hawk composed “May Day Is Lei Day in Hawai’i,” the traditional holiday song. Originally it was a contemporary fox trot, later rearranged as the Hawaiian hula song performed today.

Arbor Day, which is Latin for “Tree Day,” is an environmental holiday where citizens and groups are encouraged to plant trees and care for the already existing trees. In 1854 J Sterling Morton moved from Detroit to the area that is now Nebraska. He and other pioneers noticed a lack of trees, which were needed to act as windbreaks to stabilize the soil and to give shade from the sun. Morton planted many trees around his own home and encouraged others to do the same.

On January 4, 1872, he proposed a holiday to plant trees on April 10 that year. This was known as “Arbor Day” and prizes were awarded to the counties and individuals who planted the most trees on the day. About one million trees were planted in Nebraska on the first Arbor Day. In 1885, Arbor Day became a legal holiday and was moved to April 22, which was Morton’s birthday. In 1989 the official state holiday was moved to the last Friday in April. All states in the US now have an official Arbor Day, usually at a time of year that is has the best weather conditions for planting trees.

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Take Our Guided Horticultural Tour…

Swinging Bridge
On our exquisite 2-hour walking tour, one of our horticultural experts will point out fascinating facts about the beautiful flowers and plants in our extensive botanical collection and answer questions about tropical plants.

Your horticultural guide will first lead you to a spectacular view of Kamaee Falls, proclaimed to be one of Hawaii’s most beautiful and pristine waterfalls. This location is a must stop for both novice and professional photographers alike.

From there, you will be taking an unhurried stroll through our tropical Rainforest Trail. Watch other guests zipping high in the forest canopy and listen as our experts explain the many and varied uses of tropical plants, allowing you to smell the flowers and taste some of the ripe fruit. Continuing down the trail, you will encounter a quiet, serene, natural spring-fed stream lined by many of Hawaii’s unique plants and trees.

At the halfway point of your tour, you have the option to add a delicious lunch. Prepared and served for our guests, this unique option must be reserved in advance. Everyone will be able to partake in dessert – a sampling of fresh fruit from our own gardens.

Following the fruit and refreshment break, the group will proceed to our final destination, the magnificent Rainbow Walk. This portion of the tour meanders along a paved walkway surrounded by thousands of tropical plants.

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The Manufacturing and Painting Various Kinds of Native Cloth…

Various sorts of cloth are made with this wauti plant, some remarkably fine and even; that which has been beaten with a mallet, carved in different patterns, much resembles muslin at first sight, while that made with a grooved mallet appears, until closely examined, something like dimity. There are other kinds, very thick and tough, which look like wash-leather; but the most common sort is the pati, worn round the waists of the females. To make this, a piece of bark is beaten till it is four yards long, and more than a yard wide, and of an equal texture throughout. Sometimes two or three pieces of bark are necessary to make one piece of cloth. Five of these pieces, when finished, are spread out one upon the other, and fastened together at one end. These five pieces make only one pati. The inside pieces are usually white, or yellow; but the outside piece is always stained, or painted, with vegetable dyes of various colours. No gum is used in the manufacture of the pati, except that contained in the bark, yet the fibres adhere firmly together. Those painted red or yellow, &c. are sometimes rubbed over with a vegetable oil, in which chips of sandal wood, or the seeds of the pandanus odorotissima, have been steeped. This is designed to perfume the cloth, and render it impervious to wet; it is, however, less durable than the common pati. There is another kind of cloth, called tapa moe, (sleeping cloth,) made principally for the chiefs, who use it to wrap themselves in at night, while they sleep. It is generally three or four yards square, very thick, being formed of several layers of common tapa, cemented with gum, and beaten with a grooved mallet till they are closely interwoven. The colour is various, either white, yellow, brown, or black, according to the fancy of its owner. Nearly resembling the tapa moe is the kihei, only it is both thinner and smaller. It is made in the same manner, and is about the size of a large shawl, or counterpane. Sometimes it is brown, but more frequently white or yellow, intermixed with red and black. It is generally worn by the men, thrown loosely over one shoulder, passed under the opposite arm, and tied in front, or on the other shoulder. But the best kind of cloth made with the cultivated plant is the wairiirii, which is made into paus for the females, and maros for the men. The patis are generally four yards long, and about one yard wide, very thick, beautifully painted with brilliant red, yellow, and black colours, and covered over with a fine gum and resinous warnish, which not only preserves the colours, but renders the cloth impervious and durable. The maros are about a foot wide, and three or four yards long. The colours they employ are procured from the leaves, bark, berries, or roots of indigenous plants, and require much skill in their preparation. One or two kinds of earth are also used in mixing the darker colours. Since foreigners have visited them, they have found, upon trial that our colours are better than theirs, and the paint they purchase from ships has superseded in a great degree the native colours, in the painting of all the most valuable kinds of cloth. Their manner of painting is ingenious. They cut the pattern they intend to stamp on their cloth, on the inner side of a narrow piece of bamboo, spread their cloth before them on a board, and having their colours properly mixed, in a calabash by their side, dip the point of the bamboo, which they hold in their right hand, into the paint, strike it against the edge of the calabash, place it on the right or left side of the cloth, and press it down with the fingers of the left hand. The pattern is dipped in the paint after every impression, which is continued till the cloth is marked quite across, when it is moved on the board, and the same repeated till it is finished. The tapa in general lasts but a little while, compared with any kind of wove cloth, yet if kept free from wet, which causes it to rend like paper, some kinds may be worn a considerable time. We are at once convinced, that the people who manufacture it are neither deficient in taste, nor incapable of receiving the improvements of civilized society.” (Ellis)

Discover all of the history and lore of the Big Island at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                   Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Write a review

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

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 (These are excerpts from a book by William Ellis that has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired.)

Did You Know…?

Magnolia x alba

This large, fast-growing tree is a hybrid plant, not found in the wild. It is a cross between Magnolia montana and Magnolia alba. The tree flowers bloom during spring and fall, and blooms most heavily during the summer months. The leaves of the joy perfume tree grow up to about 14 inches long. The flowers are narrow-petaled and about 2.6 inches in length. Scarlet or brown seeds cluster along a long stalk. The flowers are very fragrant at night and only a little less so during the daytime. Each flower may last only a day or two before its petals fall to the ground—at times almost covering it. It is a large, fast growing tree. 

The essential oils taken from the strong-scented flowers of the joy perfume tree have been used as ingredients in Joy, one of the world’s most expensive perfumes, as well as in other perfumes. The joy perfume tree is also a source of timber, fuel, yellow dye, and traditional medicine. The tree’s wood is used for making boats, drums, and religious engravings. In India, however, where the tree is revered, it is rarely cut and can be found on the premises of Hindu temples. The tree is grown as an ornamental in several parts of the world. 

A related species, Michelia compressa, is a 40-foot- tall tree native to Japan that has 2-inch-wide fragrant yellow flowers.

Experience all the beauty of Hawai’i at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                    Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Have you Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Why not Write a review?

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com