Account of the Puhonua, or City of Refuge, at Honaunau…

Adjoining the Hare o Keave to the southward, we found a Pahu tabu (sacred enclosure) of considerable extent, and were informed by our guide that it was one of the pohonuas of Hawaii. There are only two on the island; the one which we were then examining, and another at Waipio, on the north-east part of the island, in the district of Kohala. These Puhonuas were the Hawaiian cities of refuge, and afforded an inviolable sanctuary to the guilty fugitive, who, when flying from the avenging spear, was so favored as to enter their precincts. This had several wide entrances, some on the side next the sea, the others facing the mountains. Hither the manslayer, the man who had broken a tabu, or failed in the observance of its rigid requirements, the thief, and even the murderer, fled from his incensed pursuers, and was secure. To whomsoever he belonged, and from whatever part he came, he was equally certain of admittance, though liable to be pursued even to the gates of the enclosure. Happily for him, those gates were perpetually open; and as soon as the fugitive had entered, he repaired to the presence of the idol, and made a short ejaculatory address, expressive of his obligations to him in reaching the place with security. In one part of the enclosure, houses were formerly erected for the priests, and others for the refugees, who, after a certain period, or at the cessation of war, were dismissed by the priests, and returned unmolested to their dwellings and families; no one venturing to injure those, who, when they fled to the gods, had been by them protected. We could not learn the length of time it was necessary for them to remain in the puahonua; but it did not appear to be more than two or three days. After that, they either attached themselves to the service of the priests, or returned to their homes.

 

The erection of such a place as the puhonua. at Honaunau, under the circumstances and with the means by which alone it was reared, (as they had no machinery,) must have been an herculean task, and could not have been completed but by the labour of many hands. We could not learn how long it had been standing, but were informed it was built for Keave, who reigned in Hawaii about 250 years ago. The walls and heiaus, indeed, looked as if it might claim such antiquity; but the house of Keave and the images must have been renewed since that time. (Ellis)

Discover all of the history and lore of the Big Island at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                   Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Write a review

 

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 (These are excerpts from a book by William Ellis that has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired.)

Did You Know…?

Angiopteris evecta. Marattia

The fronds of this fern can attain a length of up to 25 feet, while its “trunk” grows to a more modest height of about a meter. It is native to New Guinea and Northern Australia. It is considered to be invasive in Jamaica, and locally it appears to have strong invasive potential, as it is becoming very abundant in some of the gulches along the Hamakua Coast of the Big Island.

The new leaves/fronds emerge from the center of the stocky stem as a huge coil that is very interesting to see and to watch over a period of several weeks as it unfurls into a huge leaf. The dark brown sporangia are arranged in a row around the margin of each leaflet.

Experience all the beauty of Hawai’i at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                    Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Have you Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Why not Write a review?

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

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Take Our Guided Horticultural Tour…

Swinging Bridge
On our exquisite 2-hour walking tour, one of our horticultural experts will point out fascinating facts about the beautiful flowers and plants in our extensive botanical collection and answer questions about tropical plants.

Your horticultural guide will first lead you to a spectacular view of Kamaee Falls, proclaimed to be one of Hawaii’s most beautiful and pristine waterfalls. This location is a must stop for both novice and professional photographers alike.

From there, you will be taking an unhurried stroll through our tropical Rainforest Trail. Watch other guests zipping high in the forest canopy and listen as our experts explain the many and varied uses of tropical plants, allowing you to smell the flowers and taste some of the ripe fruit. Continuing down the trail, you will encounter a quiet, serene, natural spring-fed stream lined by many of Hawaii’s unique plants and trees.

At the halfway point of your tour, you have the option to add a delicious lunch. Prepared and served for our guests, this unique option must be reserved in advance. Everyone will be able to partake in dessert – a sampling of fresh fruit from our own gardens.

Following the fruit and refreshment break, the group will proceed to our final destination, the magnificent Rainbow Walk. This portion of the tour meanders along a paved walkway surrounded by thousands of tropical plants.

Experience all the fun at Botanical World…

 

Botanical World Adventures                                  Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                            Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                            Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                               Write a review

 

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808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

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For 24/7 Online reservations

 

We Visit the Burying-Place of the Ancient Hawaiian Kings…

Honaunau, we found, was formerly a place of considerable importance, having been the frequent residence of the kings of Hawaii for several successive generations. The monuments and relics of the ancient idolatry with which this place abounds, were, from some cause unknown to us. The principal object that attracted our attention, was the Hare o Keave, (the House of Keave,) a sacred depository of the bones of departed kings and princes It is a compact building constructed with the most durable timber, and thatched with ti leaves, standing on a bed of lava that runs out a considerable distance into the sea. It is surrounded by a strong fence or paling, leaving an area in the front, and at each end about twenty-four feet wide. The pavement is of smooth fragments of lava, laid down with considerable skill. Several rudely carved male and female images of wood were placed on the outside of the enclosure. A number stood on the fence at unequal distances all around; but the principal assemblage of these frightful representatives of their former deities was at the south-east end of the enclosed space, where, forming a semicircle, twelve of them stood in grim array, as if perpetual guardians of “the mighty dead” reposing in the house adjoining. A pile of stones was neatly laid up in the form of a crescent and in this pile the images were fixed. The principal idol stood in the centre, the others on either hand; the most powerful being placed nearest to him: he was not so large as some of the others, but distinguished by the variety and superior carvings of his body, and especially of his head. Once they had evidently been clothed, but now they appeared in the most indigent nakedness. We endeavoured to gain admission to the inside of the house, but were told it was tabu roa, (strictly prohibited,) and that nothing but a direct order from the king, or Karaimoku, could open the door. However, by pushing one of the boards across the door-way a little on one side, we looked in, and saw many large images, some of wood very much carved, others of red feathers, with distended mouths, large rows of sharks’ teeth, and pearl-shell eyes. We also saw several bundles, apparently of human bones, cleaned, carefully tied up with cinet made of cocoa-nut fibres, and placed in different parts of the house, together with some rich shawls and other valuable articles. When we had gratified our curiosity, and I had taken a drawing of the building, and some of its appendages, we proceeded to examine other remarkable objects of the place. (Ellis)

Discover all of the history and lore of the Big Island at Botanical World…

Botanical World Adventures                          Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                   Open daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                    Visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                       Write a review

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com

 

 (These are excerpts from a book by William Ellis that has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired.)

December 31st is New Year’s Eve in United States…

New Years Eve

New Year’s Eve is a major social holiday for many people in the United States. Many people hold parties at home or attend special celebrations to celebrate the upcoming New Year. In many cities, large scale public events are held. These often attract thousands of people.

A particularly striking aspect of the New Year’s Eve festivities is the ball drop in Times Square in Manhattan, New York City. The ball is made of crystal and electric lights and is placed on top of a pole, which is 77 feet, or 23 meters, high. At one minute before midnight on December 31, the ball is lowered slowly down the pole. It comes to rest at the bottom of the pole at exactly midnight. The event is shown on television across the United States and around the world. The event has been held every year since 1907, except during World War II.

December 31 is not a federal holiday, but it does fall in the holiday season at the end of the year. Most schools and other educational institutions throughout the United States are closed. Some organizations are closed and others are open but offer limited services. Many stores are open on New Year’s Eve, but may close early. Many theaters, clubs and other entertainment venues have special programs. It may be necessary to reserve tickets many weeks in advance.

Public transit systems may operate normal or reduced services. Some companies extend their schedules into the early hours of January 1 to enable people who have attended New Year’s Eve parties to return home safely. If you need to use public transit on December 31, it is wise to check the appropriate timetables carefully before you travel.

Around the start of the 1900s, New Year’s Eve celebrations in America started to appear.

From all of us at Botanical World…Have a very and safe New Year.

Botanical World Adventures                               Gardens, Waterfalls & Maze

31-240 Old Mamalahoa Highway                        Open Daily – 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Hakalau, Hawaii 96710                                        Have you visited us in the Past?

Mile Marker 16 on Highway 19                           Why not Write a review

 

For 24/7 Online Reservations Book your tour HERE

Or call: 808-963-5427 or Toll Free: 888-947-4753

Visit us at BotanicalWorld.com